Answering A Question With Another Question

What do you think? What Am I supposed to think???“What do I mean?” What am I supposed to mean? Many attribute this unique cultural predisposition to Talmudic scholarship, particularly the Gemara. The Gemara (500 CE) represents Rabbinical analysis of the Mishnah (200 CE – itself an analysis of the Torah) and is presented in the form of questions and answers in a kind of virtual debate that spans time and space. Others attribute this ethnic trait to Jews just being shifty and never wanting to give you a straight answer. Who is right? What? Do I look like a Talmudic scholar? Do I have to do everything for you? Let me give you a hint Einstein. One choice could be a reasonable possibility and the other choice is often voiced by Antisemites. Ha ha. Shmendrick.

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9 responses to “Answering A Question With Another Question

  1. Unfortunately answering a question with a question is a great way to get students thinking. So I for one support it!!!

  2. Barney Frank’s brilliant response to a town hall health care reform heckler comparing Obama to Hitler was to say that he would revert to his ethnic heritage and answer a question with a question. He asked the woman on what planet does she spend most of her time.

  3. Uh….Jewish people did not contrive the idea to answer a question with a question. It is called the “Socratic method” and is supposed to get the person disagreing with you to critically think about what he/she is arguing about.

    Some people do use it as forms of evasion though, however I’m going to have to disagree with you.

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  5. The Socratic Method is not the same as answering a question with a question. The Socratic Method was (is) to ask a question, then when the question is answered, another question is posed by the original questioner…. This is designed not only to make the other person think, but also to question themselves and to get to the deep root of the first question…

  6. Pingback: How to Deal with Hostile Questions; and The Spiritually In and Out. Some Surprises | Dreaming Beneath the Spires

  7. Pingback: How to Deal with Hostile Questions. - Dreaming Beneath the Spires

  8. Pingback: How to Deal with Hostile Questions; and The Spiritually In and Out. Some Surprises - Dreaming Beneath the Spires

  9. Jesus often asked return questions to those who posed questions to him. His response to the question of paying taxes to Ceasar was a brilliant strategy to refute the Pharisee’s attempt to trap him into a statement that would give them grounds to accuse him of blasphemy. Jesus often used this strategy in his teaching to make the hearers think and evaluate their position in relation to God. Questions are a way of developing critical thinking skills and I used them a lot in my teaching of fifth and sixth graders.

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